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St. Mark's School of Texas
10600 Preston Road Dallas, TX 75230
The Student News Site of St. Mark's School of Texas

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The Student News Site of St. Mark's School of Texas

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Mr. May’s Guide to Fantasy Football

Math Department Chair Shane May gives insight into the world of fantasy football
Fantasy football is a popular past time for football enthusiasts.
PHOTO/ CREATIVE COMMONS
Fantasy football is a popular past time for football enthusiasts.

As the 2024 NFL season begins, fantasy football leagues are popping up all over the school. The football phenomenon that has taken hold of generations has finally returned. People of all ages are attempting to win (or just not to lose) against their friends in the ultimate battle of football knowledge. But what if you don’t have any?

Math Department Chair Shane May has your back.

Mr. May is the school’s local fantasy football expert, a fitting role for one of its leading mathematicians. He hopped on the fantasy train decades ago, learning the rules from a book he bought in 1991.

But some things never change, and May knows that fantasy football leagues are still won and lost with the draft. The most important draft strategy is to look out for the late round draft picks, who make or break a season.

“Justin Jefferson and Christian McCaffrey, everybody loves those guys,” May said. “But you’ve got to make hay in rounds six through 12, that’s where championships are won.”

May finds the most success developing a deep bench with players he can count on. If his starters fall short, the bench will be able to step up.

“Find a few hidden gems,” May said. “Take some shots on talented running backs who aren’t starting yet, because maybe in week eight or ten they will be starting.”

Another vital aspect of success in the draft is preparation.

“Over all the years, I think the one mistake I see the most is the mistake of panic,” May said. “People often succumb to the peer pressure of taking a player they don’t love because their friends are taking good players early, especially with quarterbacks and tight ends.”

Another mistake May avoids is going all in with trades right after the draft. Instead, he likes to wait until week five or six to really see how his players are performing. 

“Don’t trade early,” May said. “Give it some time, because there’s always some guy who always lights it up for two weeks, and you never hear from him again. Don’t give up on players.”

Most of all, May believes you shouldn’t take the league too seriously. It’s all about friendly competition

“The purpose of fantasy football is just to have fun with your friends,” May said. “It’s about out-performing your friends. It’s just fun. You don’t have to be hyper-athletic, or incredibly brilliant, you just have to have some knowledge.”

 

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About the Contributor
Joshua Goforth, Staff Writer